Archive for website content

Social Media News – 5 Signs You’re Out of Touch

Inc: 5 Signs You’re Out of Touch With Your Audience – “Here are five sure signs that you, or your organization, may be out of touch with the people or businesses that are buying your product or service:”

 

Mashable:How Google+ Can Succeed at Business Without Really Trying – “Many have already dismissed Google+ as a failed venture, but it would be premature to write off the network as a social experiment gone awry. Just as Gmail was key to Google’s enterprise play, Google+ is fast becoming the enterprise social networking tool of choice for savvy office workers.”

 

PEW Internet: The rise of e-reading  —  21% of Americans have read an e-book.  The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more than in the past and to prefer buying books to borrowing them. (h/t Paul F at USPTO)

 

Mashable: Yahoo Then and Now: Diagnosing a Sad Decline – “I’ve been watching Yahoo for over 15 years. Back in the 1990s it seemed unstoppable. There was no Google and though many other sites were offering indexed searches of the Web, Yahoo’s approach, which was more of a directory (they actually used AltaVista’s index at one time), seemed to get that the Web is more than just a gigantic bucket of words, it’s content.”

 

Marketing Charts: Social Media Most Common Online Agency Service Offering – “83% of online marketing agencies offer social media marketing services, while an additional 7% plan to do so in the future, according to a HubSpot report released in April 2012.”

 

Mashable: Sheryl Sandberg Leaves Work at 5:30 Every Day — And You Should Too – “Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg is familiar with the funny, uncertain feeling that comes with checking out soon after 5:00 to be with family, and although she used to worry about what others thought of her departure time (which is a completely reasonable hour to head home, by the way), she has finally reached a point where she can take off at 5:30 p.m. without the lingering concern of how others are perceiving her.”

 

techPresident: Let’s All Talk About Congressional Email – What is the flood of emails pouring into Congress doing to national politics? Matt Glassman, an adjunct professor of political science at Catholic University, thinks it might be creating reasons for individual members to focus less on local politics and more on attention-getting national issues.

 

Mashable: 10 Resume Tips for Technology Professionals – “Everyone can use a little help with their resume, especially if they’re pursuing a career in a highly technical field. These ten tips can help tech professionals optimize their resumes in order to nab that great gig.”

 

techPresident: Campaigns & Elections Magazine Announces ‘CampaignTech Innovators’ – Campaigns & Elections magazine has announced its 2012 CampaignTech Innovators in the areas of campaigns, advocacy, Capitol Hill and nonpartisan innovation. Candidates are nominated by their peers. The winners “all demonstrate a visionary approach to the future of digital politics and advocacy,” according to Campaigns and Elections. The recipients will officially receive the awards on April 19 at the CampaignTech Conference in Washington D.C., and most of the names will be familiar to regular techPresident readers.

 

ReadWriteWeb:Eye Movement Study Reveals Six Must-Know Things About Facebook Brand Pages – “The Facebook Timeline that brand pages were forced to switch over to last week is “flawed,” according to an eye movement study of six brand pages by SimpleUsability, with many of the new features going unnoticed or being misunderstood.”

 

MarketingCharts:Consumers Happier With Products Bought Online Than In-Store – “Looking at online feedback from both in-store and online shoppers, the company found that the average feedback rating among 19-24-year-olds was 4.48 for their online purchases, compared to 4.40 for their in-store purchases.”

 

SocialMediaToday: 3 Keys for the Content-Challenged – “Let’s take a look at three keys that will help you get a handle on the content process:”

 

SocialMediaToday: Social Media Marketing: Three Mistakes to Avoid in 2012 – “Unfortunately, there aren’t too many “gurus” who will warn you against what you shouldn’t  do. Luckily for you, by the time you’re done with this article, you will know the three biggest mistakes you should avoid in your social media marketing efforts.”

 

SocialMediaToday:  19 Tools for Pinterest Pros – “Below are just a few of the tools and services now available for use with Pinterest that are especially handy for brands, marketers, and Pinterest devotees.”

 

SocialMediaToday: 3 Ways to Maximize Your Network Relationships – “By maximizing your communication with potential clients and target markets, you will open several doors and in so doing, build greater opportunities for your business and for those on your network.”

 

SocialMediaToday: 3 Key Aspects of Facebook’s Timeline Format – “Here’s are 5 key aspects to check before you prepare to upgrade your pages to Facebook’s Timeline format.”

 

Social Media News – Prepare Your Brand for Social Media

MarketingProfs: Six Ways to Prepare Your Brand for Social Media’s Visual Revolution – “As social media continues to evolve, one reality is coming into focus: Brands are becoming more visual. One indication is the emergence of new kids on the block, such as the image-driven social network Pinterest. Another is the recent updates to more established social platforms, such as Facebook’s Timeline. What’s clear is that brands without a solid visual vocabulary will be left behind.”

 

Mashable: Major League Baseball Uncorks a Social Media Homer – “Can Major League Baseball pitch a perfect season with social media? The league is taking impressive steps to beef up its social presence and engagement with fans this year.”

 

techPresident: Tumblr Gets a Director of Outreach for Causes and Politics – Liba Rubenstein recently became Tumblr’s new director of outreach for causes and politics after spending the last several years at News Corp, most recently as director of their Global Energy Initiative. Rubenstein was previously MySpace’s public affairs coordinator, and managed MySpace’s causes and politics channels, before taking on her role in corporate social responsibility at News Corp.

 

Mashable: MLB Fan Cave: The Core Of Major League Baseball’s Social Strategy – “The MLB Fan Cave is a shrine to Major League Baseball in downtown New York City, decked out in baseball memorabilia, quirky artwork with high-tech touches, and televisions — lots of televisions. The Fan Cave, and the people in it, are at the very core of Major League Baseball’s social media strategy.”

 

AllthingsDTime Inc. Hearst, Conde Nast, Meredith Launch “Netflix For Magazines”  —  Remember Next Issue Media, the “Hulu for Digital Magazines” consortium made up of the biggest names in publishing?  It has finally delivered something worth talking about: Call it Netflix for Magazines.

 

Mashable: Global Internet Slowdown: Is Anonymous to Blame? – “Anonymous is claiming responsibility for a cyberattack against Chinese websites — one that may also be having an impact on Internet speeds across the world.”

 

CMO.com: Seven Metrics to Prove Marketing’s Worth – “At the heart of the problem is the lack of meaningful corporate marketing metrics. CMOs don’t lack for data, but many fail to turn those numbers into information that’s valuable in the business context”

 

Mashable: How One Non-Profit Aims to Create Open-Source Government – “As a non-partisan, non-profit organization, the Sunlight Foundation is taking the ethos found among the open-source software movement and applying it to government. It’s one goal is to publish the government’s public data in an easy-to-access location, at no cost to users. Unlike similar services, its data is free. The foundation says its work is for the benefit of concerned citizens and investigative journalists.”

 

DataXU:Marketing in the Digital Age Whitepaper (download) – “most marketers believe data-driven marketing enables better understanding of their customers, but 78% admit they don’t adequately use the available customer data.”

 

Mashable: 8 Tips To Maximize Your Brand’s YouTube Presence – “This is why brands need a YouTube game plan that covers all aspects of the brand channel, including aesthetic, video content, and comment moderation. Below are eight tips for creating such a plan and turning your brand’s YouTube channel into a video hotspot.”

Social Media News – Friending Facebook Blog

Friending Facebook BlogTeacher’s aide fired for refusing to hand over Facebook password  —  Summary: Kimberly Hester, a teacher’s aide at an elementary school, was fired last year for refusing to give her Facebook password to her supervisors.  She is now fighting a legal battle with the school district.

Mashable: Forget Google Instant: In the Future, Search Engines Will Read Your Habits – “Wolfram Alpha CEO Stephen Wolfram’s vision of what the word “Instant” could mean for search is a bit more literal. He envisions some type of search engine that could — through data maps of personal data history — provide reports automatically when they’re needed without an explicit query. He counts this sort of “preemptive delivery of information” among “a large number” of projects the data company has been working on.”

 

SearchEngineWatch: Google April Fools’ Day Pranks 2012: 8-Bit Maps, Chrome Multitask Mode & More! – “For Google, April Fools’ Day is the annual launch day for a slew of gag products and hoax services you’ll likely never see in real life. Google’s practical jokes began a day early in 2012, with 8-Bit Google Maps, Chrome Multitask Mode making their debut, then continued early this morning with the YouTube Collection, Google Racing, Click-to-Teleport search ads, and much more.”

 

Mashable: 4 Facebook Features Marketers Can’t Afford to Ignore – “If you have a brand or a business to market chances are you’re using a social media management application to monitor online mentions, schedule updates, and generate reports. But if you really want to be an effective marketer, you need to develop a deeper understanding of which networks are most vital to your company, and what network features are key. In Facebook’s case, we’re talking about some powerful community management components that are unmatched by its competitors, and often overlooked by marketing pros. Here are the four that simply can’t be ignored.”

 

The Verge1940 US Census becoming fully searchable online through volunteer effort  —  Today the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) released images of the 1940 Census, and a project is already underway to ensure that the information becomes easily available to anyone who wants to know a bit more about the Great Depression.

 

Mashable:White House to Developers: Help Us Build Job Search Apps – “The White House has a request for app developers around the country: help young people find summer jobs. It’s the administration’s first-ever “Code Sprint,” an open-source development free-for-all — sort of like an Iron Chef competition for coders.”

 

HowTo.gov: Changing the Way We Communicate at Work – “A Digital Gov University webinar,  Yammer: The Power of Social Networking Inside Government Offices, found Yammer can change the way we communicate internally. Yammer helps people collaborate more easily and better engage with their coworkers.”

 

Mashable: Why ‘Slacktivists’ Are More Active Than You Think [INFOGRAPHIC]

Targeting Your Site

Aiming at two groups of people

The most successful websites are those designed with their target audience clearly in mind. Your target audience is simply those people who you hope to attract to your site. Good church websites are hard to create because they must reach two target audiences, not just one. The key to ensuring that your website works well is to design according to the different needs of these two audiences. Your first and most important audience is those people who are not yet Christians but who are considering coming to your church (perhaps because they have a friend or neighbor who goes, but they want to find out more). The church website offers them an ideal way to find out about the church and the Christian faith in an anonymous way before taking the plunge and coming along in person. Your website’s second audience is your existing church members. This group is less important than the first, simply because there is probably little which you can place on the website that they don’t already know, or can’t easily find out from another source. So do provide information relevant to church members, but not at the expense of making the site inaccessible to your main audience of non-churchgoers.

Providing relevant content

The key to good design is to ask yourself what the members of each target audience are looking for when they visit your website. Potential visitors to your church probably want to know:

  • ·         Is this church weird, or do normal people go as well?
  • ·         What do Christians believe?
  • ·          Why do people go to church?
  • ·         Where is the church?
  • ·         How do I get in touch?
  • ·         What times are the services?
  • ·         Which service should I go to?
  • ·         Are there facilities for children?

Many church websites do not answer these sorts of questions. We often come across sites which look good, but which don’t rate very highly because they are not focused on the needs of non-churchgoers. By contrast, a good church website is aimed primarily at those who do not yet come to church.

The sort of information which church members may look for on the website is very different. They are more likely to ask questions like:

  • ·         Who is preaching next Sunday?
  • ·          When is the next WELCA/Council meeting?
  • ·          Is the prayer meeting on Tuesday or Wednesday?

Since the questions which church members are asking is so very different from that asked by other visitors, it is almost impossible to write one page which is interesting to both sets of visitors. Either you end up giving church members information they already know, in which case they won’t bother looking at the website very much, or you confuse potential church visitors. The solution is to have different pages for different audiences. For example, to tell people about the Sunday services create one page containing the basic information which an enquirer might need to know (e.g. service times), and then provide a link to a second page which contains detailed information for church members (e.g. who is preaching). If this is done throughout the site then you will achieve your aim of providing a website which is welcoming and informative for both your casual visitors and your church members.

An additional audience

There is a third group of people who will visit your site, namely those people who are already Christians but who don’t go to your church. Perhaps they go to another local church and came across your website, or perhaps they recently moved into the area and are looking for a church. Whoever they are, there is no need to design your website to reach these people. If you have followed the advice given above, your site will already welcome them and provide all the information they need to know.

Defend our freedom to share …

On the web for the past several weeks and months, the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act currently before Congress, if passed, would have serious consequences for the internet and would change the landscape drasticly.

The real question is how should society best balance the needs of the copyright holders and the  public using the internet, when sharing content is increasingly becoming the status quo. There are no easy answers.  We all need to be concerned about how this develops. Wikipedia’s FAQ provides a lot of information.

In a talk, Clay Shirky provides some background and brings forth the real issues.

 

A wiki is a tool used on websites for communication.

 

A wiki is a tool used on websites for communication. 

A wiki (Listeni/ˈwɪki/ wik-ee) is a website that allows the creation and editing of any number of interlinked web pages via a web browser using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor.[1][2][3] Wikis are typically powered by wiki software and are often used collaboratively by multiple users. Examples include community websites, corporate intranets, knowledge management systems, and note services. The software can also be used for personal notetaking.

Wikis may serve many different purposes. Some permit control over different functions (levels of access). For example, editing rights may permit changing, adding or removing material. Others may permit access without enforcing access control. Other rules may also be imposed for organizing content.

 

The Power of Words

This short film illustrates the power of words to radically change your message and your effect upon the world.

A day in the life of social media

A Day in the Life of Social Media

How powerful can social media be? Watch and find out.

The nine tribes of the internet

Successful Church Websites Know Their Visitors

It is always a good idea to write the content of your church website for those who will be using your website. A lot of times the website is written for the theologian, the church staff or the pastor. Remember who will be reading your site and style your writing for them. So it is very important to style your writing for the various users of your church website.

  • Church members: This group is probably the easiest to write for. They are interested in events that are happening and the photo album because they might find their picture there and want family and friends to come and see. So the information needs to be accurate, up to date, and something they can show their friends and family.
  • The curious: They have very little experience with the church. Most of their knowledge is from what they see in movies, hear in the news and know from what others tell them. Here is an opportunity to share with them a little about who you are, what activities you are involved in and the fact that they may very well fit in. The website is their front door to easily find out more about you and may even encourage them to visit.
  • The New: I told my son that when someone is looking for a church because they just moved into the neighborhood the first thing they will do is check out the churches website. His comment was that is what he did. Since that is the case, what are they checking out? The first question to be answered: Is there a website to begin with?  The second: Is it up to date? The third question: Are they friendly toward kids? How the website answers these question says a lot to the newcomer and if he will even visit your church.

The church member, curious and newcomer have different expectations and needs. When you’re writing content and managing the website and your website incorporates the needs of these groups you will have a successful church website. Guess who is coming to church?